Tag Archives: PTSD

Treating PTSD In Heart Kids And Their Families

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The mental and emotional impact of a child’s heart condition can last long after treatment has gotten the physical symptoms under control.

For some heart kids and their families, these effects can be debilitating. I’ve heard many heart parents ask if what they’re experiencing is possibly post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Read More

Barb Roessner

Hi, I'm Barb, and I'm a Physician Assistant and coordinator of the Heart Failure and Transplant Program at Children's Hospital & Medical Center in Omaha. I work with patients and families at every step of the journey, from diagnosing their child's heart condition to my favorite part—calling them to say "We have a heart."

Can Parents Experience PTSD from Their Child’s Heart Condition? (Part 2)

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In our last blog post, we tackled an experience that most parents of children with serious heart conditions have probably faced—post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Many heart transplant parents are understandably consumed with being by their child’s bedside. But with that, they neglect themselves, even when they are showing clear signs of PTSD or extreme anxiety. Read More

Barb Roessner

Hi, I'm Barb, and I'm a Physician Assistant and coordinator of the Heart Failure and Transplant Program at Children's Hospital & Medical Center in Omaha. I work with patients and families at every step of the journey, from diagnosing their child's heart condition to my favorite part—calling them to say "We have a heart."

Can Parents Experience PTSD from Their Child’s Heart Condition? (Part 1)

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When most people think of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), they imagine military veterans returning home from combat. Soldiers have been so exposed to human tragedy, their minds become conditioned to fight or flee, and surprising things—a firework exploding, someone dropping a book on the bus—could transport them back to the battlefield without warning.

People with PTSD may have trouble sleeping and struggle with constant anxiety. They feel like they’re on alert every second and struggle with memories of the traumatic events that are vivid enough to feel as if they’re happening to them again, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

But PTSD doesn’t just affect veterans. It can develop in individuals who have experienced any type of trauma—including parents who are watching their children struggle with a serious heart condition. Read More

Barb Roessner

Hi, I'm Barb, and I'm a Physician Assistant and coordinator of the Heart Failure and Transplant Program at Children's Hospital & Medical Center in Omaha. I work with patients and families at every step of the journey, from diagnosing their child's heart condition to my favorite part—calling them to say "We have a heart."